Photo Courtesy of Google Earth

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Will you be changing the speed limit through Moose Pass?
  2. Why isn't the pathway being extended to the Johnson Pass Trailhead as part of this project?
  3. Why do we have a school zone right in Moose Pass? It is not next to the school and there are no bus stops in that area.
  4. How can I find out where the DOT&PF's Right-Of-Way (ROW) is located in relation to my property?
  5. Can we afford this project in our current fiscal climate?

Answers

  1. Will you be changing the speed limit through Moose Pass? 

    No.  The 45 mph and 35 mph speed limits will remain in place. However, the Department will evaluate the length of the speed zones with the goal of  improving driver compliance with the posted speed limits.

  1. Why isn't the pathway being extended to the Johnson Pass Trailhead as part of this project?
    Along the segment of the highway between the 'ball fields' where the pathway currently ends and the Johnson Pass Trailhead, shoulders at least 6 feet wide will be provided. The roadway shoulders will function as a shared use thoroughfare for bicyclists and pedestrians. The existing separated pathway is not proposed to be extended with this project as there is little room between the lake and mountainsides for a pathway to fit next to the road without cutting deeply into the base of the mountains and/or filling into the lake which would result in additional ROW impacts, increased environmental impacts, and increased project costs. The current project was prioritized and included in the State Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP) without a pathway extension. However, if the community feels strongly that a pathway should be developed, you can nominate the pathway as a separate project for future STIP consideration.

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  1. Why do we have a school zone right in Moose Pass? It is not next to the school and there are no bus stops in that area.

    The DOT&PF implements a Safe Routes to School program to enable and encourage children to safely walk or bicycle to school. The school  zone and crosswalk in Moose Pass were provided and located to serve approximately 13 homes across the highway from Moose Pass Elementary School, providing a route to school for children at those residences. The times that the flashing beacons are turned on and off are set to match each half hour time window that students would walk to school at the start and the end of the school day.


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  1. How can I find out where the DOT&PF's Right-Of-Way (ROW) is located in relation to my property?

    This information will be contained in the ROW basemap, which is currently undergoing agency review. As soon as the ROW basemap is recorded, or finalized, it will be made publicly available and accessible via DOT&PF's and DNR's websites. In the interim, the Draft Preliminary ROW base mapping is available on the documents page of this website. If you have difficulty downloading the maps or if you have any questions, please contact:

    Dorothy Stickman
    Right-of-Way Assistant
    (907) 269-0680
    dorothy.stickman@alaska.gov


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  1. Can we afford this project in our current fiscal climate?

    This project is funded with a combination of state and federal funds. The State of Alaska provides about 7% of the funding and the Federal Highway Administration provides about 93% of the funding. Currently, the funding for project design are included in the federal spending plan which covers 2016-2019. The funds needed for right-of-way acquisition, utility relocation, and construction are beyond the planning horizon of the current federal spending plan (after 2019).

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FAQs (201 kb)